Twins Draft Picks- Rounds 21-30

Lovett is in good company.

Rounds 21-30 saw the Twins take a lot of arms and one position player. Some of these guys have been compared to Major League stars, and some carry with them the burden of playing for the same teams are Hall of Famers. Although none of them have signed, the Twins can take from these rounds a few draft-and-follows, who may one day be stars within the organization.

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21st Round – RHP, Christopher Kelley: Starting off this string of pitchers selected by the Twins is Christopher Kelley. The fire-baller Kelley drafted after his junior season at San Jacinto College North via the 645th pick overall. In addition to Kelley, San Jacinto has produced Major League stars such as Houston Astros pitcher Andy Pettitte and 7-time Cy Young award winner Roger Clemens. With his lean and athletic build, as well as his defensive abilities on the mound, Kelley is compared to Chicago Cubs hurler and 14-time Gold Glove recipient Greg Maddux. Considered to have very fluid arm action, Kelley's arsenal includes a fastball that averages in the high 80's, which from time-to-time is known to have a little extra gusto behind it. Also, his "bread-and-butter" pitch consists of a very tight rotating, 12-6 curveball that possesses a very quick break.

22nd Round – RHP, Curtis Leavitt:Keeping to the right-handed pitching trend, out of Vasquez High School in Southern California is Curtis Leavitt, the 675th selection overall. Leavitt was a member of the 2005 USA Softball Junior Team. He is currently playing in the Jr. Men's Tournament and the team is holding a 4-3 mark. Originally a catcher, the team needed his bat in the lineup so they switched him to third base. He is awaiting the scores of his SAT test before he accepts a scholarship to Saint Mary's College.

23rd Round – RHP, Kenneth Herndon:Drafted in the 38th round out of high school by the Kansas City Royals in 2004, Herndon elected college to be the best route to take. Joining up with Gulf Coast Community College, Herndon elevated himself into a 23rd round selection by the Minnesota Twins just a year later, selected 705th overall. If Herndon inks a deal with the Twins, he could very well be on his way to an entirely different Gulf Coast than the one he's accustomed to; the Gulf Coast League Twins.

24th Round – RHP, Gustavo Duran:Dipping into the New York City scene, Minnesota selected Duran out of George Washington High School in the Bronx with the 735th pick. Although taller, his long and lean physique has drawn similarities to ex-Major Leaguer Ramon Martinez. Duran, who stunningly only started pitching in the 2004 season, has quickly mastered the art of the fastball. With tailing action away from lefty hitters, he also has the ability to locate the ball down in the strike zone, while averaging speeds in the high 80's.

25th Round – RHP, Aaron Lovett:Out of Kaskaskia College, Lovett became the 765th overall selection. Playing for the summer collegiate team, the East Peoria Scrappers of the CICL, Lovett joins a long line of former Major League super-stars playing in the same league. Such players include: Jeff Brantley, Norm Charlton, Gary Gaetti (who played 10 seasons with the Twins) and hall-of-famer Mike Schmidt. Lovett possesses tremendous potential, and his 6-5 build is a sure indicator of brighter pastures ahead.

26th Round – LHP, Michael Mopas:The first lefty hurler on this list is Michael Mopas. All the way from the island of Honolulu, Hawaii, Mopas was selected 795th overall out of Iolani High School. Mopas was taken back by the whole idea of being drafted. "I was pretty surprised I was taken so early", Mopas to the Honolulu Advertiser. "I was like, Whoa!" There is no word yet whether or not the left-hander will sign with the Twins, but the Twins are looking for a Junior College for Mopas so he can be a draft-and-follow pick.

27th Round – LHP, Evan Frederickson:Frederickson, drafted out of Oakton High School, was selected 825th overall. Compared to the likeness of Andy Pettitte, this 6'6" lefty comes fundamentally sound in the mechanics department with very fluent, effortless arm motion. His repertoire mainly consists of a fastball and curveball. His fastball, which has some cutting action, has tendencies of tailing away on unsuspecting right-handed hitters. His curveball, which flashes a lot of potential, has a lot of bend to it and comes with a ¾ rotation.

28th Round – RHP, Joshua Brink: With Kerry Wood as a comparative starting point, Josh Brink has already been placed in some good company. Selected 855th overall out of Mennonite Educational Institute, Brink possesses an easy-going, loose arm motion that is considered physically impressive. Brink's young arm holds a fastball and curveball in his bag of tricks. His fastball is said to have the occasional tailing and/or sinking action, with his legs holding the key to his potential, in the addition of some more velocity as well as a late-breaking slider that comes in with a ¾ rotation.

29th Round – RHP, Steven Hernandez:Hernandez is a high school pitcher out of Redwood High School in California. The first Valley high schooler chosen, Hernandez has yet to sign with the Twins. The 6'2'' hurler, who bats from the left side, also played first base in high school where he hit .452 his senior season. He was the 885th selection overall.

30th Round – 1B, Federico (Kiko) Vazquez:The only position player on this list is first baseman Federico Vazquez. Better known as Kiko, he was the Minnesota Twins' 30th selection (915th overall) out of Sebring High School. Standing 6'3", the right handed slugger possesses strong hands and wrists as well as a short swing that can generate a lot of bat speed. With the size in place and the aforementioned attributes, Kiko draws similarities to former Major League star Andres Galarraga. Kiko, every now and then can flash some leather, being defensively sound with the glove and will come up with the routine plays at the corner.

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